Episode 101: Dr. Buzz Hollander (He/Him) of Iris Integrative Health - Waimea, HI

Direct Primary Care Doctor


Dr. Buzz Hollander practices in Hawaii
Dr. Buzz Hollander

Dr. Buzz Hollander has been a Big Island physician in both clinic and ER settings since 2005. While traditionally trained in Western medicine, he prefers an emphasis on healthful lifestyles and evidence-based prevention of illness, approaching the source of chronic medical problems rather than simply treating the symptoms, and recommending the least invasive treatment options in times of acute need.


Dr. Hollander graduated from Princeton University in 1991, and attended the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine from 1998-2002, before completing his residency at the Santa Rosa (CA) Family Medicine Residency Program in 2005. He is fortunate enough to be married to Dr. Suber and share the parenting of their two daughters; on a day off, he likes to be near the water, hiking through Hawaii’s native forests, or tending to the land.


Together with his wife he has been practicing at Iris Integrative Health since 2016


 


RESOURCES:

Concierge Medicine Radio


CONTACT:

Email: office@irisintegrativehealth.com

 

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Transcript*


I came to Hawaii from my family medicine residency in Northern California in Santa Rosa. And I just met the woman who's now my wife and I started work at a community health center in a very rural town. And I did that for seven years. It was all held together by an ER gig in a rural ER, which made that all financially and practically possible as we started our family with two daughters now, and we hit a point where that ER gig was going away as our clinic had lost the contract. So, my wife, who's a naturopathic physician, and I decided to start our own practice. She was gonna continue doing cash pay fee for service with her patients, and we would share an office and I would accept all sorts of insurance.


We did that together for four years and I hit a point where it seemed like at the end of every day, I'd be getting in my car and I'd have this list of things that I hadn't gotten done that day; patients, I hadn't called, specialists I hadn't checked in with, referrals I hadn't made. And I realized that I was wearing down and not loving the work I was doing anymore.


And feeling like I wasn't able to do the job that I wanted to do, which for me centers around having relationships with my patients that are meaningful and being available to them when I needed to do my best possible work as a physician. And on top of that financially, we were barely getting by trying to hold this together in a model where I wouldn't be seeing 25 or 50 patients a day, but just 15 or 20. So it struck me I needed to change and my wife and I had a lot of discussions about it. We did a lot of planning and finally, in the summer of 2016, we opened our own practice it was Direct Primary Care. We've built it up since then, and it's been really meaningful and all in all great ride for us.


My name is Dr. Buzz Hollander MD. Our practice is Iris Integrative Health and this is my DPC story.





Dr. Buzz Hollander has been a big island physician in both clinic and ER settings since 2005. While traditionally trained in Western medicine, he prefers an emphasis on healthful lifestyles and evidence based prevention of illness, approaching the source of chronic medical problems rather than simply treating the symptoms and recommending the least invasive treatment options in times of acute need.


Dr. Hollander graduated from Princeton University in 1991 and attended the UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine from 1998 to 2002 before completing his. See at the Santa Rosa California Family Medicine Residency program in 2005. He is fortunate enough to be married to Dr. Suber and share the parenting of their two daughters on a day off.


He likes to be near the water hiking through Hawaii's native forests or tending to the land together with his wife. He has been practicing at Iris Integrative Health since 2016.


to the podcast Dr.


Hollander. Thanks Mary. I appreciate being on it. I


think this is so cool because as DPC has expanded over the years, this podcast is expanding its episodes to reach Hawaii now.


So for the, all of those of you who have wondered, how is DPC practiced in Hawaii? Dr. Hollander is going to share that today.


It's practiced with a Loha of course. I love


it. I just like knowing that we were going to be speaking today, it's almost like you could feel the breeze. It's just so much more relaxing just knowing that you're in Hawaii, it's coming through the zoom lens.


So that's awesome. So I loved your opening statement in terms of it really gave a roadmap as to what your journey was like on a global view, I wanna go back to 2005 when you graduated residency in Santa Rosa. And at the time, you know, when you were looking at prospects as a family medicine doctor after residency, what was on your horizon?


I was very happy with the idea of having a job, any job. And I think a lot of people fresh outta residency have that feeling of, oh my God, somebody actually wants to hire me. I know nothing about medicine, but I felt extremely fortunate. The place where I was moving to was on the big island of Hawaii and you're listeners who are not familiar with Hawaii geography.


The big island is not Oahu. There is nothing on the big island. There are two small mediums, town, cities, Hilo, and Kona, whole population is under 200,000 and it is a huge island. It is the size of the state of Connecticut. So it's rural, it's medically underserved. And we happen to be in a particularly rural part of the island between a couple of small towns.


OCAH and weea, and it just so happened that there was this community health center, literally down the road, 15 minutes from the house that my wife had just bought. And I. Thrilled to be able to get a full-time job there. And then that morphed into a little less than full-time and they had a little rural, ER, which had just opened up.


you know, if you've ever worked in rural, ER, it's, it can be very easy in terms of you get paid for 24 hour shifts and you get some sleep most of the time. And then every now and then you get terrified from something that maybe you weren't fully trained to handle, but it all worked for a while.


And it was a great job out of residency for me, because I had five colleagues, other MDs who were in the building that I could go to for help and counsel, and best of all, I was in this rural really culturally rich place. Working in a setting where I was getting to meet everybody. I mean, from famous celebrities to a lot of multi-generational Hawaiians people who had recently been laid off when the plantations had closed on that side of the island.


And it was a great entry into Hawaiian culture and the community in a way that would've very hard if I'd gone right into private practice.


Awesome. And I love that because, you know, especially as you talked about in your opening statement, relationship based care really matters. And when you are part of that community that you're living in and you're really attuned to who is in your community and their needs, it really makes a difference in their care, especially under the DPC model.


Absolutely. So when you talk about Hawaii and how your experience at post residency started, I wanna just ask, did you guys always intend to buy a house in Hawaii and open practice in Hawaii? Or was that something that just happened?


I will say my wife knew for a long time that she belonged in Hawaii and she.


Was her timing was fortunate for her. She finished natropathic medical college in Portland, right? When they were kicking off a natropathic residency program here on the big island, Earl Bachan who was a pioneered behind a pacemaker was starting up this new hospital that they wanted to be the Mayo of the Pacific in our little town of YME.


It didn't work out quite that well, but it is still standing. And part of that was trying to have a real focus on integr